Breastfeeding is one of the most natural and rewarding things you’ll experience as a new mom, but it doesn’t always come without challenges. Because of this, many moms have a million questions running through their minds--When will my milk come in? Am I producing enough milk for my baby? Are there things I should and shouldn’t eat during this time? The list goes on and on.

If you’re a mom, we want you to know that you’re not alone in this! So many women like you face challenges when it comes to breastfeeding, which is why working with a Lactation Consultant can be an amazing option.

Here at Majka, we want to provide you with the best resources so that you can enjoy your motherhood journey and feel confident in the decisions you make. That’s why we reached out to International Board Certified Lactation Consultant Rebecca Agi! Rebecca teaches online breastfeeding classes and specializes in in-home and virtual lactation consultations. As a new mom herself, she understands the importance of breastfeeding support as well as the challenges new moms face on a day-to-day basis.

We sat down with Rebecca and asked her to share the 3 most commonly asked questions she receives about breastfeeding as a Lactation Consultant. Here’s what she had to say!

3 Commonly Asked Questions About Breastfeeding, ft. Rebecca Agi

@bestmilkla

Question 1: How can I tell if my baby is getting enough milk?

This is the number one question I get asked as a lactation consultant. If you can agree to the following 4 statements, chances are your baby is getting enough!

  • Your baby has wet and dirty diapers. Wet and dirty diapers are a great indication that your baby is getting enough milk. For the first 5 days of life, your baby should have at least one wet and dirty diaper for each day of life (1 pee and 1 poop on day 1, 2 pees and 2 poops on day 2, etc.) After that you can expect about 5-8 wet diapers and 3-4 yellow and seedy stools per day.
  • Your baby is gaining weight. All babies lose some weight in the first few days after birth, but then gain it back by 2 weeks or sooner. After that, your baby should be gaining about 4-7 ounces per week.
  • Breasts feel softer at the end of a feeding. During the first few weeks, women tend to produce more milk than Baby actually needs. This is most often characterized by breast fullness and/or engorgement. If your breasts feel softer after feeds, you can rest assured that your baby is transferring milk well!
  • Your baby seems satisfied at the end of a feeding. If your baby self-detaches, looks relaxed, and becomes drowsy or sleepy, he has most likely had enough. However, your baby might wake up within a few minutes wanting to be “topped off.” If that happens, simply offer your breast again, as this will can help fully satisfy your baby.

@bestmilkla

Question #2: Are there any foods that need to be avoided during breastfeeding?

I recommend staying away from sage, parsley and peppermint while breastfeeding as these herbs can greatly reduce milk supply for some women. Alcohol and caffeine, however, do not need to be entirely avoided but should be limited.

@bestmilkla

Question 3: What's the best way to prevent nipple soreness?

This is a question I get a lot from expecting moms. Proper positioning/correct latch is the number one way to prevent nipple soreness and discomfort. There's no nipple cream or balm available that will help prevent soreness if the latch isn't correct. It's also really important to break the suction with your finger at the end of a feeding if your baby doesn't self-detach. Once you get the latch down, things (should) get much easier! If it doesn’t, I highly recommend seeking help from an IBCLC.

Thank you so much to Rebecca for taking the time to share her expertise with us! To connect with Rebecca, be sure to check out her website and give her a follow on Instagram.

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Rebecca Agi is an International Board Certified Lactation Consultant (IBCLC) with a private practice based in Los Angeles, California. Rebecca teaches online breastfeeding classes and specializes in in-home and virtual lactation consultations. As a new mom, Rebecca understands the importance of breastfeeding support as well as the challenges new moms face on a day-to-day basis. For more information, please visit www.BestMilkLA.com. You can also follow Rebecca on Instagram @BestMilkLA.

Fueling Motherhood

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